30 Dec

The UK is leaving the European Union, will this affect me as a tourist?

Brexit is everywhere, in the news, the papers, on people’s lips and maybe on those visitors coming into the UK. Brexit, or its full name “the exit of the United Kingdom from the European Union” is going to happen in March 2019.

It’s happening and it’ll either be easy or it’ll be tough, depends on the politicians on both sides of the coin. At the moment it’s not looking easy…So what is its impact on the tourist coming to the UK? The answer is luckily nothing major. Just a fewsmall things.

European tourists will have to queue with the non-European tourists for immigration. It’s still the same though, long lines and slow immigration officers asking silly questions. Just the European queue will be non-existent, instead replaced with a United Kingdom only queue. The UK never gave up its currency, so there will be no reverting back to the home currency from the Euro. The monarchy will still be here as will the rain. So basically not a lot will change on that front. The number of Europeans living in London is set to drop which is shame.London has always been a
proud multicultural mega city. The loss of a hundred thousand French, Spanish,  German and other Europeans will be a noticeable loss. On the flip side, a lot of Europeans who have lived in the UK for a number of years will be able to settle and that’s not a bad thing. Prices of European goods being consumed in the UK could be set to rise if there isn’t agreement on a trade deal between the two parties. Wine, cheese and a few other tourists’ favourites could become even more expensive in London. This may put some tourists off from coming over on their well- deserved holidays, instead could they choose a different destination like Prague or Copenhagen? I doubt it. Other capital cities cannot compete with the history, architecture, things to do, places to see, people and beer (notice I didn’t mention food) London has everything. It will still have everything post Brexit, apart from a trade deal with its largest trading partner (the EU) and several large car manufacturers in the South Wales region (who will inevitably opt to move their plants to cheaper locations, like Ireland) Brexit will impact the number of Politicians in the UK. Those failed UK MPs who opted to become Euro MPs will have to come home. Used to houses with three inch thick carpets in Brussels will have to come down a peg or two, and move back into their country homes in the English countrysideSwapping champagne for cider. The foreign visitor maybe lucky enough to bump into one or two of them. They will be regaled by stories of the good old days on the continent. The tourist coming to the nation’s capital will still be able to see the usual amazing sights that crowd London’s streets and thoroughfares. They won’t budge and will stay. Even French buildings such as
the Ritz Hotel on Piccadilly will be allowed to remain. I cannot stress how much London has to offer any first time tourist. It is packed with things to do and not just all centralised in one area, but spread out across the capital.

 

 

I have heard that people are shying away from visiting the UK due to fears of far right views from the average citizen. The vote to leave the European Union was seen by many around the world as an expression of British racism. I assure you this is not the case. The generation of those fellow countrymen who are appalled by a different shade of skin colour are either dead or dying. Yes there is a small minority, but there is always a minority that are narrow minded. Britain loves everyone, it doesn’t matter where you come from, what you look like or which football team you support (Only if you are French, wearing a France football jersey, on the day France have won the world cup, will you get any stick. And that stick will be jovial and harmless) Britain is kind and generous to everyone, London amplifies this point beautifully. You can see everyone from everywhere in the world’s favourite city. This is what makes the UK brilliant ad everyone should visit at least once in their lives. I think what us British were trying to say when we voted to leave the EU was that we want democracy, we don’t want to be ruled by non-British people. Although politicians are hounded and ridiculed by our press and even by each one of us in Britain, we are actually very fond of them and we want them to lead us, and no one else. The Queen is one of the symbols of British uniqueness and British pride. She will still be here post us leaving the EU. She will still make us proud of our history and make us remember who we are. Visitors to the UK can see traces of this history wherever they go. This will not change post Brexit. You go to Parliament square next to Westminster Palace; you will see that we celebrate democracy. There are statues of some of the most famous people who believed and died for democracy. Our political beliefs won’t change when leaving the EU, there is argument to suggest they are now stronger. Visitors to the UK won’t see a change in the UK post Brexit. What will stay the same is the humour, weather, sense of pride and history in abundance. The banter we give each and everyone one of you will remain, as will the hospitality, efficient working order of our country and politeness the world expects. Beneath the politeness of any British person is a proudness that has been there for generations. Plus a wicked sense of humour that many of you won’t understand, but we forgive you.

Back